Conflicts of Interest

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Poor Behavior #12: Lack of Openness or Honesty

May 16th, 2012 at Wed, 16th, 2012 at 6:56 am by Vivian Scott

When people don’t know what’s happening they often get a movie going in their head that helps them explain the situation.  The film versions they conjure up are rarely romantic comedies; rather, most resemble horror movies with terrible endings.  A lack of honesty or openness at work can put everyone’s mental movie-making skills to the test.

I love a dramatic film as much as the next guy but when it comes to resolving conflict, I know I need to set my desire for a good story aside and focus on what’s real.  With that said, we’ve probably all had coworkers who like to make even the most mundane topics sound intriguing and captivating.  As long as you know that about them, don’t get too worked up when they want to send out those “I know something you don’t know” messages.  If what you’re experiencing goes beyond that, address your concerns privately and give the person an opportunity to let you know if they’re in a position to share information.  Accept that sometimes people are sworn to secrecy for a certain amount of time or that they may be in the “thinking” stages and need to explore a number of options before making an announcement.

Withholding information is one thing; one’s words not matching one’s actions is another.   We’ve all had occasion to feel blindsided, disrespected, or embarrassed because we took someone at their word and then something else actually happened.  When you find that someone has been less than honest give them a (private) opportunity to explain what happened.  Our sense that someone didn’t tell the truth isn’t always accurate, so certainly give people the benefit of the doubt.  If it turns out that your suspicions are true, let the person know that you expect more and that you’re willing to work on trusting them again.  Move forward with an agreement that it won’t happen again.

We’re all human and when you find yourself in a circumstance in which you’ve been less than honest or were unnecessarily closed off about particular information, make whatever apologies you need to make, come clean, and be better than that from here on out.  Keep in mind that you’re the star of your coworker’s mental movie, so work on creating a better ending.

Vivian Scott is a Professional Certified Mediator with a private practice serving King and Snohomish Counties. She is the author of, "Conflict Resolution at Work For Dummies" and a contributing author of "Thriving in the Workplace For Dummies" as well as "Managing All-in-One For Dummies" (Wiley Publishing). Ms. Scott is a Certified Mediator Member of the Washington Mediation Association and received their Outstanding Contributor Award in 2012. Her mediation cases range from assisting couples through divorce and parenting plans to creating new workplace environments for organizations of all sizes. You can learn more about Vivian by visiting her website at www.vivianscottmediation.com. or www.anytimeseminars.com

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